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City of Novi
City of Novi

Environmental Issues and Resources

DEQ Public Notices

Resources

Coyotes

Invasive Species
 

DEQ Public Notices

City of Novi proposed Cresent Boulevard extension and new Spur Road (3/5/15)
 

Resources

City of Novi Recycling and Household Hazardous Waste information

 Alliance of Rouge Communities (ARC) Resource Recovery Guide (A Citizen's Guide for Recycling and Household Hazardous Waste Disposal)

 Rouge River Watershed Goals Poster

 Acceptable Practices for Managing Livestock Along Lakes, Streams and Wetlands

Wetland and Woodland Stewardship brochure Wetland and Woodland Stewardship brochure
Also, check out wetlands information from the Environmental Protection Agency's website.  This series of wetlands fact sheets covers a wide variety of topics, such as economic benefits, wetlands mitigation banking, the local role in wetlands protection, Section 404 of the Clean Water Act, and more.

Tip Cards

 Practice Good Car Care

 Fertilize Sparingly and Caringly

 Carefully Store and Dispose of Household Cleaners, Chemicals, and Oil

 Help Keep Pollution Out of Storm Drains

 Choose Earth Friendly Landscaping

 Seven Steps to Clean Water

Links

ARC - Alliance of Rouge Communities

SEMCOG – Southeast Michigan Council of Governments

OCWRC – Oakland County Water Resources Commission (formerly OCDC – Oakland County Drain Commission)

WC DPS-ESG - Wayne County Department of Public Services - Environmental Services Group

FOTR - Friends of the Rouge

MDEQ – Michigan Department of Environmental Quality

EPA – Environmental Protection Agency

HRWC – Huron River Watershed Council

SMLC – Southeast Michigan Land Conservancy

Eating Fish from the Rouge River

Flyer - Eating Fish from the Rouge RiverFish are part of a healthy diet. Most fish are safe to eat. But some fish have high amounts of chemicals in them. Eating some types of fish too often can cause health problems, especially for women and children. MORE


Coyotes

CoyoteCoyote numbers are growing in Southeast Michigan. There is currently no definitive statistic on the coyote population in Southeast Michigan. What scientists do know is coyotes do not attack people and less than 1% of coyotes become nuisances. It is in the best interest of both coyotes and humans if coyotes retain their instinctive fear of people. Coyotes that are fed become accustom to people and present a human safety risk. DO NOT feed coyotes. The Novi Department of Public Safety would like to offer some helpful hints in the unlikely event you have an encounter with a coyote.

Living with Coyotes

  • Never feed coyotes
  • Coyotes are more active at sunset and sunrise
  • Keep small pets inside at nights
  • Cover garbage
  • Do not leave dog or cat food or water outside overnight
  • Make sure bird feeders are not accessible and never toss food scraps on the ground
  • When walking dogs at sunrise or sunset, Keep them on a leash
  • If you see a coyote around your home; shout, create noise, and make commotion to scare them away.
  • Become knowledgeable, not fearful.

What Should I Do

  • Never approach or touch a coyote
  • Observe from a distance
  • Do not run from an aggressive coyote; if followed by a coyote, shout or throw something in its direction
  • Do not feed coyotes
  • Eliminate outside food sources

Additional Coyote Resources

 Decoding Coyote Tip Sheet
 Michigan Coyote Facts

Knowledge and an informed perspective can help humans and coyotes co-exist.

 

Invasive Species

Like much of Michigan and the entire United States, the City of Novi has many invasive plant species that have crept their way into our lives. An invasive plant species is any species that has been introduced into an ecosystem to which the species is not indigenous and which has a tendency to spread rapidly. Introduction is sometimes accidental, but often is initiated by humans intentionally importing the plant to an area normally beyond its natural growing range. Invasive plants often cause harm to environmental, economic or human wellbeing. While many invasive plant species have been introduced from outside the United States, there are also many species within the U.S. that have become invasive due to their introduction or spread to distant areas within our own borders.

According to the United States National Arboretum, “An invasive plant has the ability to thrive and spread aggressively outside its natural range.” A naturally aggressive plant may be especially invasive when it is introduced to a new habitat. An invasive species that colonizes a new area may gain an ecological edge since the insects, diseases, and foraging animals that naturally keep its growth in check in its native range are not present in its new habitat.

Some invasive plants are worse than others. Many invasive plants continue to be admired by gardeners who may not be aware of their weedy nature. Others are recognized as weeds but property owners fail to do their part in preventing their spread. They may multiply and come to dominate large areas in just a few years.

The Michigan Invasive Plant Council (MIPC) has an excellent website including many links to other sites with information on invasive species. You can access the MIPC website by clicking on the link. The MIPC lists the negative effects of invasive species on natural and managed ecosystem:

  • Reducing biodiversity
  • Altering hydrologic conditions
  • Altering soil characteristics
  • Altering fire intensity and frequency
  • Interfering with natural succession
  • Competing for pollinators
  • Poisoning or repelling native insects
  • Displacing rare plant species
  • Increasing predation on nesting birds
  • Serving as reservoirs of plant pathogens
  • Replacing complex communities with single species monocultures
  • Diluting the genetic composition of native species through hybridization
  • Being difficult and/or costly to control
  • Impeding industries and threatening agriculture
  • Endangering human health
  • Posing a significant drain on the economy 

Common Offenders

There are many invasive plant species found throughout Michigan. Informed property owners and citizens can do a lot in the battle against these plant bullies. Here are a few of the biggest offenders that can be found in and around the City of Novi.

(Click on images to see larger version.)

Purple LoosestrifePurple Loosestrife

Also known as the "purple plague," purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is an ornamental plant known for its purple-spiked flowers. Once limited to gardens in the Northeast, it now chokes wetlands across the country.

Common ReedCommon Reed

Common Reed (Phragmites australis) is a widespread and aggressive invasive species. The plant is common throughout Michigan in roadside ditches, along shorelines and within wetland areas. It quickly colonizes on sites where the soil has been disturbed and moisture is present. Able to easily grow to 12’ in height, this invasive spreads through both seeds and under ground roots (rhizomes). Phragmites is one of the most common invasive plant species within the City of Novi.

Tree of HeavenTree of Heaven

Also known as Stinking Sumac, the Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima) is a rapidly growing deciduous tree with pale gray bark, light brown twigs and large compound leaves. It can flourish in unfavorable conditions with little care, and was a common stock in nurseries across the country as early as the 1840s. Today it has become an out of control invasive, complete with spiked thorns.

Multiflora RoseMultiflora Rose

Multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora), also called rambler rose, is a thorny, perennial shrub with clusters of fragrant white-to-pink flowers that bloom in May or June. Small, bright red rose hips develop during the summer. It is often found on the edges of farms and along highways.

English IvyEnglish Ivy

English ivy (Hedera helix) is one of the most popular ground covers in North America. However, its potential for escape is notorious. In the Pacific Northwest, English ivy invades the forest floors. Its evergreen leaves smother other native forest plants by denying them light.

Garlic MustardGarlic Mustard

Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata (Bieb.) Cavara and Grande) is one of Novi’s more threatening invasive species. It is a biennial, a plant with a two-year life cycle, growing its first year as a seedling and rosette stage plant and flowering the subsequent year. It most often grows in the forest understory or along forest edges but is also able to invade undisturbed forest habitats. It tolerates low light levels and is adapted to take advantage of disturbed habitats such as trails, roadsides and areas where trees have been removed. Garlic mustard has no significant natural enemies in North America.


For more information and helpful links regarding Garlic Mustard and other invasive species please visit the Michigan State University Extension website by clicking on the link.